Central Nash Water and Sewer District - Water and Sewer

Creating Capacity With The Future In Mind

Beginning in the early 2000’s, Nash County undertook a study to determine if there were areas within the county where water and sewer services were feasible. The Wooten Company was selected as the firm to prepare the study, and a more than ten-year development was kicked off. Details included a population projection for the entire county to determine future needs, and were followed by hydraulic modeling of the resulting proposed county-wide water system.  The report evaluated the source water in reference to meeting future demands, and ultimately set forth a plan of infrastructure with emphasis on infrastructure needs for primary corridors that would provide interconnections for service to all local governments within the county. Following its delivery, an application for funding from USDA –Rural Development was prepared, alongside an environmental assessment of the future project that was recommended.
As a result, over the next three years, more than 100 miles of waterline ranging from 2-16 inches in diameter, along with two new booster pump stations and a 400,000 gallon elevated storage tank were designed and installed.


Phases I & II – The first installations of the newly created Central Nash Water and Sewer District
The newly created Central Nash Water and Sewer District set its initial goal to service the area west of Rocky Mount, NC and south of the Tar River Reservoir.  During Phase I, designs were developed for the installation of approximately 113,000 LF of water line that ranged in diameter from 2- to 12-inches, as well as a new 500 gallon per minute booster pump station needed to convey water from the City of Rocky Mount and also a new 300,000 gallon elevated storage tank.  The $3.075 million project received funding assistance from the USDA Grant/Loan program and construction was completed in 2009.
Phase II simultaneously installed 169,000 LF of waterline that also ranged between 2- and 12-inches in diameter, and crossed Interstate 95 twice and the Tar River once.  The $2.88 million Phase II received similar financing from a USDA Grant and was completed in 2009.


Phases III & IV - Central Nash Water and Sewer District
The Phase III expansion involved the installation of 152,300 LF of 2- to 16-inch water line and a new second booster pump station to convey water from the City of Rocky Mount.  Costing $2.771 million, The Wooten Company was again able to help secure funding assistance from the USDA Grant/Loan program and, after overcoming the challenge of crossing Interstate 95 twice, Phase III completed in 2011. As an add-on to the contract in the summer of 2013, additional design services provided for SCADA control to 14 remote facilities throughout the system.  The facilities included 7 wastewater pumping stations, 3 elevated water tanks, 3 booster pumping stations, and a water meter vault.  The system allowed for monitoring and control of all 14 facilities from the Water Operations and Maintenance Building via radio transmitter.
The remaining Phase IV area required very similar planning, design, construction administration and construction observation services, however was complicated and pushed forward due to contamination in several individual wells north of the Town of Bailey.


Studies had revealed that these wells contained high levels of arsenic, and a Preliminary Engineering Report and an Environmental Assessment indicated the need for a final expansion of the water district. This phase involved the installation of 267,400 LF of 2-inch through 12-inch waterline as well as a new 250,000 gallon elevated storage tank and 500 gallon per minute booster pump station to convey water from the lower pressure zone serving the previous Phases 1 through 3, as well as the storage tank. After overcoming an additional challenge of crossing the Tar River, Phase IV established a new pressure zone which allowed water to be extended farther west into the District’s desired areas and allowed for 500 new customers to come online. The $6 million project again received funding assistance from a USDA Grant and construction was completed in 2014.